New funding for CHT2 UK case study

Newcastle University has been successful in securing additional funding to continue the CHT2 UK case study on Hadrian’s Wall. Approximately £75k of funding has been secured from the UK’s Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Iapetus Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP) in partnership with English Heritage and Historic England. The PhD, entitled “Assessing and predicting natural environmental impacts on cultural heritage landscapes: a case study on Hadrian’s Wall” will commence in September 2017 and run for 3.5 years. The new research programme will overlap with the closing stages of the current JPI-CH project, funded in the UK by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), building on the legacy of CHT2. The overall aim of the new programme is to assess the vulnerability of tangible cultural heritage to natural hazards under a changing climate regime, demonstrating this on an iconic monument of international renown.

New team member for CHT2

Last week the CHT2 project welcomed its newest member, when Karolina Fieber gave birth to Baby Emilian Amram. Emilian was born at 20:31 on Tuesday 11th April 2017 and weighed in at 3.3 kg. Congratulations to Karolina and Jake on the expansion of their family, from everyone involved in the project!

CHT2 at 3D-Arch 2017 conference

As well as organising a project meeting at 3d-Arch, the CHT2 project was also well represented in the technical programme. The conference, which took place in Nafplio, Greece, from 1st to 3rd March included an oral presentation by the USAL unit on the CHT2 methodology. The POLIMI (below) and NCL groups also presented poster presentations on their case studies. Papers are available in the Resources section of the website.

Third CHT2 Meeting

The CHT2 project has met today in Nafplio (Greece), in the framework of the 3DARC conference (http://www.3d-arch.org), for a midterm update about the various activities at M18.

The whole Description Of Work (DOW) of the project was reviewed and discussed by all the partners, defining strategies for respecting the various commitments despite the administrative difficulties met, not depending on the partners will.

The actual individual at the meeting were: Jon Mills from Newcastle University (NCL); Diego Gonzàles Aguilera and Pablo Rodríguez Gonzálvez from University of Salamanca (USAL); Slawomir Mikrut form Scientific Stanisław Staszic Association (SSSA); Gabriele Guidi and Sara Gonizzi Barsanti from Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI).

CHT2 UK meeting with stakeholders, English Heritage and Historic England

Members of the CHT2 UK team today met with representatives of English Heritage and Historic England, Mark Douglas and Paul Bryan, at Newcastle University. The purpose of the meeting was to update the stakeholders on progress made at the three Hadrian’s Wall study sites:  Beckfoot, Birdoswald and Corbridge. Of particular interest to all were the results at Corbridge, and it was agreed to focus further on this site, acquiring further data from the English Heritage Archives in Swindon. The team also thanked Karolina Fieber for her hard work as she prepares to leave the CHT2 project to have a baby in April – thanks, Karolina, and all best wishes for the future from everyone involved in CHT2!

Archaeological remains of the circus on the modern topography of Milan

In the frame of the WP3, the Politecnico di Milano unit worked capillarly, in connection with the inspectors of the Superintendence of Milan,  on the collection of all the street numbers of the actual buildings in which basements are still visible the remains. Starting from the analysis of the circus plan provided by the work of De Capitani D’Arzago, it was started a work of the identification of the accurate position of all the documented remains.

Analysing all the material stored in the Archives of the Superintendence, all the restrictions of the cadastral units interested by archaeological findings were specified but, given the period in which these restrictions were defined, most of them are brief and unclear. Hence, it took a long search and archival investigation to identify the single structures, their position and their extension.vincoli

Map of the arcaheological remains regarding the roman circus of Milan

Massive Online Open Course – Hadrian’s Wall: life on the Roman frontier

More than 6000 on-line “students” have joined the Massive Online Open Course (MOOC) on Hadrian’s Wall, which starts today. The online course runs for six weeks and explores the archaeology of the most heavily fortified frontier in the Roman Empire, its people and their lives. Led by CHT2 Co-Investigator, Professor Ian Haynes of Newcastle University, the MOOC will feature the CHT2 project in Week Three. You can sign up to the MOOC at https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/hadrians-wall.

Collection of archival images of the Circus of Milan

In the frame of the WP3 of the CHT2 project, the Politecnico di Milano unit proceed on  the inventory and the selection of all the photographs stored in the Archives of the Superintendence in Milan, for the 4D reconstruction of the roman Circus of Milan.

During the excavation occurred along with the reconstruction of the city after the end of the WWII, the archaeological documentation regarded written texts, drawing and pictures, taken from different points of view or in different phases during the excavation.  This selection regards artefacts visible during construction projects (e.g. the metro, new
skyscrapers) or inspections of the superintendent.

This material has a valuable importance for the 4D reconstruction of the roman circus, because permits to obtain information on archaeological remains that now are no longer visible.a012828

Example of one pictures collected, regarding the excavation of the area and the finding of the archaeological remains.

Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Survey of Beckfoot, Hadrian’s Wall, UK

The Hadrian’s Wall case study took a step forward today when the British weather finally allowed the UK team to undertake an UAV survey at Beckfoot, Cumbria. A Quest300 fixed-wing UAV (pictured), owned by Newcastle University, was used for the survey. With a maximum 15-minute flight time, the Beckfoot area was divided into two overlapping parts (north and south) and surveyed under two separate sorties. Supporting ground operations took place simultaneously and the survey data will be augmented by archaeological excavations and geophysical survey, including gradiometry and resistivity, surveys previously conducted in June.